Pennsylvania’s Dirt Gravel, and Low Volume Road (DGLVR) Maintenance Program provides funding to eliminate stream pollution caused by runoff and sediment from the State’s comprehensive network of unpaved and low volume public roads. The Program was enacted into law in April 1997 as Section 9106 of the PA Vehicle Code, with $5 Million in annual funding for “environmentally sensitive road maintenance” for unpaved roads. The goal of the Program is to create a more environmentally and economically sustainable low volume road network through education, outreach, and project funding. Beginning in 2014-2015, a portion of the Program’s funding was directed towards paved or sealed low volume roads with 500 vehicles per day or less.

In 2020, the Jefferson County Conservation District was able to provide nearly $580,000 in DGLVR funds to 10 different municipalities to complete 11 Dirt, Gravel and Low Volume Road Projects.

Low Volume Road Projects

  • Mohney Road in Beaver Township

Problem: The existing ditches were saturated with water causing damage to the road base. This road base damage caused alligator cracking on the tar and chip road surface. There was severe erosion at the outlet of existing cross pipes that were undersized.

Solution: 1,674 feet of underdrain was installed to help protect the road base by safely conveying subsurface runoff along the roadway, instead of through the road base. Several turnouts were installed to direct surface flow away from the roadway and into a stabilized area. Five 15-inch diameter cross-pipes were replaced with 18-inch diameter cross pipes. Concrete inlet boxes were installed on their sides on each of the 5 replaced cross pipes to stabilize the road banks surrounding the inlets. End walls were installed to stabilize each outlet. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Hoffman Road in Oliver Township

Problem: Erosion was occurring at the inlet of an existing stream crossing of Beaver Run, a high quality waterway. The existing road ditch discharged at the stream crossing, causing additional erosion. There was severe scour occurring under the existing stream crossing due to it being undersized, and not being able to pass large storm events.

Solution: A new 18-inch diameter cross pipe was installed to divert ditch runoff away from the roadway, into a well vegetated area. The inlet and outlet of this new cross pipe were stabilized with head and end walls. The existing 6-foot-wide concrete stream crossing was replaced with a 12-foot-wide plated arch pipe. The inlet and outlet of this new stream crossing were stabilized with head and end walls. Two turnouts were installed to direct surface flow away from the roadway and into a stabilized area. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

Dirt and Gravel Road Projects

  • Turner Road in Eldred Township

Problem: Erosion was occurring at the stream banks on the inlet and outlet of an undersized stream crossing. The existing stream crossing of Steele Run, a high quality waterway, was collapsing, preventing it from properly conveying the stream and depositing road material directly into the stream.

Solution: The existing 5-foot diameter pipe was replaced with a 10-foot wide bottomless arch pipe. The inlet and outlet of this new pipe were stabilized with head and end walls to prevent future erosion. R5 limestone was used to stabilize the streambanks on both ends of the crossing. The road base was built up nearly 2 feet to provide additional stability over the new stream crossing. Two turnouts were installed to direct surface flow away from the roadway and into a stabilized area. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Spring Creek Road in Heath Township

Problem: Sediment from the existing road traveled directly to the Callen Run, a high quality waterway, during each rain event. The existing ditches were saturated and the road profile was flat, which was causing road base failure. The existing stream crossing was severely undersized, causing erosion under and along it.

Solution: A new 18-inch diameter cross pipe and a turnout were installed to direct runoff from the roadway to a well vegetated area instead of directly into the stream. An underdrain was installed to safely convey subsurface water along the roadway instead of damaging the road base.

The existing 3-foot diameter stream crossing was replaced with a 7-foot-wide by 5 foot 6-inch-tall squash pipe, that was sized to match the existing bank-full width of the stream. The road base was also built up 1 foot to help strengthen the road and re-establish crown to the road profile. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Swamp Run Road in Knox Township

Problem: Roadside springs and an adjacent driveway saturated the existing road ditches, causing damage to the road base. An existing cross pipe was undersized. Road banks were eroding into the inlet of the existing cross pipe.

Solution: The existing 12-inch diameter cross pipe was replaced with an 18-inch diameter cross pipe. The inlet and outlet of the new cross pipe were stabilized with head and end walls. A concrete inlet box was placed on its side to protect the inlet from erosion. 2,273 feet of underdrain was installed to help protect the road base by safely conveying subsurface runoff along the roadway, instead of through the road base. A layer of woven geo-textile fabric was placed on the existing road grade and shale was used to build up the road 1 foot to strengthen the base and re-establish a crown to the road profile. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Aber Road in Oliver Township

Problem: The existing road base was eroding into the inlet of a cross pipe. The existing road ditch was saturated with running water. An existing stream crossing of an unnamed tributary to Big Run, a cold water fishery, did not have head or end walls, contributing to the erosion at the site. The existing road profile was flat and did not have adequate pathways for surface runoff to exit the roadway.

Solution: The existing 15-inch-diameter cross pipe was replaced with an 18-inch diameter cross pipe. The inlet and outlet of the new cross pipe were stabilized with head and end walls. 721 feet of underdrain was installed to safely convey subsurface drainage away from the road base. The road base was strengthened by building it up 1 foot and incorporating a crown into the profile. Two turnouts were installed to direct surface flow away from the roadway and into a stabilized area. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Blose Hollow Road in Perry Township

Problem: The existing stream crossing of Foundry Run, a cold water fishery, was undersized, causing erosion. The existing ditches were saturated from roadside springs and the road profile was flat, causing road base failure. The existing cross pipe was undersized.

Solution: The existing 15-inch diameter cross pipe was replaced with a 2-foot diameter squash pipe. An 18-inch diameter cross pipe was added to direct surface drainage away from the roadway, into a stabilized area. The inlet and outlet of the new cross pipe were stabilized with head and end walls. Outlets of the new pipes were both stabilized with clean stone. 270 feet of underdrain was installed to help protect the road base by safely conveying subsurface runoff along the roadway, instead of through the road base. Two turnouts were installed to direct surface flow away from the roadway and into a stabilized area. The existing 3-foot-wide stream crossing was replaced with an 8-foot-wide squash pipe. The inlet and outlet of the new stream crossing were stabilized with head and end walls. The road was built up to establish crown in its profile. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Dixon Road in Polk Township

Problem: The existing road ditch was saturated with running water, causing erosion and sediment to travel directly to the stream. The road was lower than the surrounding area, causing it to function as a ditch. There wasn’t anywhere for surface runoff to exit the roadway. Head and end walls on the existing stream crossing of an unnamed tributary to Windfall Run, a high quality waterway, were not providing adequate stabilization.

Solution: Three new cross pipes were installed, each with an inlet box placed on its side to stabilize the area surrounding the inlets. Outlets were stabilized with end walls and stone. Two turnouts were installed to direct surface flow away from the roadway and into a stabilized area.

Existing head and end walls were improved to provide adequate stabilization. A layer of woven geo-textile fabric was placed on the existing road grade and shale was used to build up the road 3 feet to strengthen the base an re-establish a crown to the road profile. 2A limestone was used to cap the shale. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched. Several trees were to help daylight the road.

  • Huber Road in Porter Township

Problem: The existing stream crossing of an unnamed tributary to Mahoning Creek, a cold water fishery, was undersized, resulting in erosion at the inlet and outlet. The existing ditches were saturated and the road profile was flat, causing sediment to enter directly into the stream and damage to the road base.

Solution: The existing 2-foot-wide stream crossing was replaced with a 4-foot-wide squash pipe. The inlet and outlet of the new stream crossing were stabilized with head and end walls. The 2 existing 15-inch diameter cross pipes were replaced with 18-inch diameter cross pipes. 4 new 18-inch diameter cross pipes were installed to help separate and disperse surface flow. The inlets and outlets of each of the new cross pipes were stabilized with head and end walls. 1,425 feet of underdrain was installed to help protect the road base by safely conveying subsurface runoff along the roadway, instead of through the road base. Shale was used to build up the road to strengthen the base an re-establish a crown to the road profile. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Shaffer Road in Ringgold Township

Problem: Roadside springs and field drains discharging along the roadway saturated the existing road ditches, causing damage to the road base. An existing cross pipe was undersized. The outlet of the existing cross pipe did not have an end wall, contributing to the erosion at the site. The existing road profile was entrenched, flat and did not have adequate pathways for surface runoff to exit the roadway.

Solution: The 2 existing 15-inch diameter cross pipes were replaced with 18-inch diameter pipes. Three new 18-inch diameter cross pipes were installed to help separate and disperse surface flow. Each of the new cross pipes were stabilized with head and end walls. 1,670 feet of underdrain was installed to help protect the road base by safely conveying subsurface runoff along the roadway, instead of through the road base. The road base was strengthened and sheet flow was encouraged by building it up 3 feet and incorporating a crown into the profile. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

  • Jimtown Road in Warsaw Township

Problem: The existing stream crossing of Windfall Run, a high quality waterway, was severely undersized, causing a large plunge pool at the outlet of pipe. The existing stream crossing did not have a headwall which contributed to erosion around the inlet. The existing cross pipe directed road runoff directly into the stream while causing additional stream bank erosion

Solution: The existing 6-foot-wide stream crossing was replaced with a 14-foot-wide squash pipe. The inlet and outlet of the new stream crossing were stabilized with head and end walls. The plunge pool was filled and proper stream grade was re-established. The exiting cross pipe discharge was redirected into a stone-lined outlet and well vegetated area. All disturbed areas were seeded and mulched.

Recommended for you

Trending Food Videos