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Kids aren’t always excited about back to school season or the homework it brings with it, but helping your child stay organized can keep your home from being overrun with math worksheets and will make those after school study sessions a little less chaotic. Here are X kid-friendly office items to keep their study space orderly.

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MoneyTips

Your credit score is one of the primary items that lenders check when they consider loaning you money. A lower score means greater risk, and lenders will charge you a higher interest rate because of that difference – but how much could it cost you over the lifetime of a loan?

According to a new study from LendingTree, if you have only fair credit instead of very good credit, the difference can cost you over $45,000.

LendingTree analyzed loan data from their database to assess the costs of a lower credit score as applied to five different sources of borrowing (credit card debt, personal loans, auto loans, student loans, and mortgages). Interest was calculated based on the average loan amount for each type of credit. Combined, the loans totaled $310,263 – dominated by the average mortgage loan of $234,437.

At interest rates available with very good credit (740-799), the total interest payment over the lifetime of all five credit sources was $212,498. At t...

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Cause Of Death: Low Credit Score

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MoneyTips


Waiting to Buy

According to a new study by the Urban Institute, millennials are waiting longer than previous generations to enter the housing market. Approximately 8% fewer millennials of ages 25-34 own homes as compared to baby boomers and generation Xers at the same point in their lives.

Why are millennials late to homeownership? The Urban Institute provided several reasons:

External Factors

The study found three primary external factors keeping millennials from entering the market.

1. Lack of Supply – Affordable housing is rare in more popular urban areas that millennials prefer (and where jobs are located). Housing starts are at approximately 1.2 million – an improvement from the post-housing crisis 550,000 units in 2009, but still below levels from the 1960s. Low supply leads to high prices even for modest homes.

2. Tight Cred...

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A sparkling clean car can make your older vehicle feel brand new again but getting your car professionally detailed can cost you as much as a nice dinner out or a new pair of shoes. Fortunately, an initial investment in a few cleaning supplies and a little elbow grease can help you detail your car like the pros without breaking the bank.

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Tobacco baskets, those simple, flat, rectangular or square woven baskets once used to display tobacco leaves at markets in the South, are now being used for amazing home decor pieces. And, you don’t have to scour flea markets in the South, either, to find a wide selection of these baskets. You can go to your favorite craft or home decor store to find this new decor trend.

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Hard water deposits, lime scale, or mineral build-up can make even clean tubs, sinks, and toilets look grimy. But when calcium and magnesium build up on your bathroom fixtures, it can be difficult to get rid of. Here’s how to tackle that gunk on your shower head, sink, or toilet bowl.

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With its simple elegance, navy blues and whitewashed hues, you may be reluctant to say goodbye to a Cape Cod look once summer draws to a close. Not to worry, this classic beach style doesn’t have to be relegated to the warmer months -- after all, New England gets its fair share of winter too. Read on to learn about the essential elements of Cape Cod style and how to emulate a nautical look in your home all year long. And if you find something you like, click through one of the links below and use the code CAPE20 to get $20 off your purchase of $100 or more!

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MoneyTips

Are you having trouble getting a home loan because you have no suitable credit history? Has your credit activity been dormant for a long enough time that lenders can't properly evaluate your risk?

The FICO credit-scoring standard used by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac requires that potential borrowers have a credit account open for at least six months to be able to assess credit risk properly. Without that background, you are "credit invisible." You may be responsible with money and pay rent, utilities, and cell phone bills on time – but those aren't considered in evaluating mortgage loan applications.

According to data from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), approximately 26 million people are considered to be credit invisible. Nearly 19 million people are similarly shut out of mortgages because they have "stale credit" – their credit history hasn't had enough rece...

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Do Nothing and Get a Higher Credit Score...Again!