(BPT) - The daily routine for a parent can be hectic and stressful, and having a child that is living with atopic dermatitis (eczema) can be difficult.1

Eczema is a common skin condition that may develop during childhood.2 Eczema typically occurs in characteristic areas of skin and is often identified by scaly or dry patches.2,3 Nearly 18 million children and adults across the United States live with the condition.4 About 90 percent of those with eczema have the mild-to-moderate form of the disease.5 And you shouldn’t be too surprised your child has eczema, if you have asthma, hay fever, or eczema yourself. Genetic factors are associated with eczema.3,4

If your child has eczema, the following tips may help you care for your child and their skin.

1. Know what to watch for.

Eczema may look different on different people, so it's important to know what to watch for.2 The face, neck, arms and legs are common sites for many people, depending on their age.2 Eczema often appears as a rough, red skin rash.3 If you think your child has eczema, talk with a doctor to learn what to look for and discuss a possible treatment plan. Here’s another tip: consider pajama or bath time as an opportunity to take a moment and check for any changes in your child’s skin.

2. Tame the triggers.

For some, eczema may flare, or get worse, when they're exposed to different triggers, even if they are currently treating their eczema.2 Food choices, sweat, stress, and clothing types may all be possible triggers for your child's eczema.3,6 Monitor your child’s skin, and if you notice a change, talk to their doctor to find the strategies that may best identify these triggers.

3. Prepare appropriately.

As a parent, you’ve probably learned that children never stop moving. Purses are filled with all sorts of things to help keep your child entertained. That preparation can also be applied to eczema. For example, heat and sweat are common causes of flares. Try dressing your child in comfortable, loose clothing or uniforms that have been washed before your child wears them.6 Don’t forget those new gym clothes and soccer jerseys!

4. Adjust bath time routines.

Children take baths—for obvious reasons!—but bath time might be a challenge for children with eczema. Try to limit bath time to 5-10 minutes up to once per day with warm, not hot, water.7 Applying a moisturizer soon after bathing may also help ensure your child's skin is moisturized.2,7

5. Understand your options.

There is no cure for eczema, but there are treatment options available. EUCRISA® (crisaborole) ointment, 2% is a steroid-free topical ointment for people with mild-to-moderate eczema and can be used on all skin tones from face to feet, for adults and kids as young as 2 years old.8 EUCRISA is a topical treatment that works both above and below the skin to treat eczema.9 The specific way EUCRISA works is not well defined.8 It can be applied topically to the skin, including the face. Do not use in the eyes, mouth or vagina.8 Talk to your child’s doctor to see if EUCRISA is right for your child and visit www.EUCRISA.com to learn more.

While the above tips may help you manage your child’s eczema, always be sure to talk to their doctor to help identify the best treatment plan. To learn more about EUCRISA, visit www.EUCRISA.com.


Do not use EUCRISA if you are allergic to crisaborole or any of the ingredients in EUCRISA.

EUCRISA may cause side effects including allergic reactions at or near the application site. These can be serious and may include hives, itching, swelling, and redness. If you have any of these symptoms, stop using EUCRISA and get medical help right away.

The most common side effect of EUCRISA is application site pain, such as burning or stinging.

EUCRISA is for use on skin (topical use) only. Do not use EUCRISA in your eyes, mouth, or vagina.


EUCRISA is a prescription ointment used on the skin (topical) to treat mild-to-moderate eczema (atopic dermatitis) in adults and children 2 years of age and older.

See Full Prescribing Information at EUCRISA.com.

For more information call 1-866-EUCRISA (1-866-382-7472).

This article is sponsored by Pfizer Inc.

1 Lifschitz C. The Impact of Atopic Dermatitis on Quality of Life. Ann Nutr Metab. 2015;66(suppl 1): 24-40.

2 Bieber T. Atopic dermatitis. Dermatol. 2012;1(3);203-217.

3 Akdis CA, Akdis M, Bieber T, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of atopic dermatitis in children: European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology/American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology/PRACTALL Consensus Report. J Allerg Clin Immunol. 2006;118:152-169.

4 Hanifin JM, Reed ML. A population-based survey of eczema in the United States. Dermatitis. 2007;18(2):82-91.

5 Paller AS, Tom WL, Lebwohl MG, et al. Efficacy and safety of crisaborole ointment, a novel, nonsteroidal phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor for the topical treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) in children and adults. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2016;75(3):494-503.

6 Oszukowska M, Michalak I, Gutfreund K, et al. Role of primary and secondary prevention in atopic dermatitis. Postep Derm Alergol. 2015;32(6):409-420.

7 Eichenfield LF, Tom WL, Chamlin SL, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis. Section 2. Management and treatment of atopic dermatitis with topical therapies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;71(1):116-132.

8 EUCRISA® (crisaborole). Full Prescribing Information. December 2016.

9 Jarnagin K, Chanda S, Coronado D, et al. Crisaborole topical ointment, 2%: a nonsteroidal, topical, anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor in clinical development for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(4):390-396.

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